Day 6 – Regions, Resources & Populism

This is the last list of potential disruptive factors that could influence the Canadian Public Service over the next decade or so.  See the previous blogs for the previous set of disruptions and Seven Days of Disruption blog for the entire set.  These are in support of November 22, 2017 FMI Conference – Disruptive Writers.

  • Quebec and Regional Tensions (editor)
  • Resource and Commodity Supply, Demand and Price (adapted from 2015)
  • Rising storm of populism; Canada and Cultural War in the Age of Trump and the Progressives (adapted from 2016 and editor)

Quebec and Regional Tensions (editor)

A full generation has grown up without ever hearing about Quebec separation, referendums or regional tensions.  Can it last?  The first challenge is geography, Canada is big – very big.  Many Canadians will never visit all of the provinces and territories, how can you sustain a country in which geography conspires against a sense of affiliation.  The next challenge is economics.  Canada has been sustained in the past half century by a wealth transfer from the Western Provinces to the vote rich eastern regions.  Despite multi-billion dollar provincial deficits, Alberta is still a ‘have’ province and will contribute to the ‘have-not’ areas.  Finally there is tribalism or regional identity.  Quebec has been the center of this with two referendums and the 1999 Clarity Act being central activities in the twenty years from 1980 to 2000.  Northern Canada, with the creation of Nunavut, seeks its own path to prosperity.  Atlantic Canada continues to struggle economic although recent mineral discoveries have brightened these prospects. So, will Canada continue to exist and prosper as it moves toward its bicentennial or will it be tore asunder by its size, politics and economics?

Resource and Commodity Supply, Demand and Price

Adapted from A.T. Kearney 2015: The resource “super-cycle” of the early 2000s saw global prices for energy, minerals and agriculture prices hit 30-50 year highs.  A new global resource “slump cycle” began in 2014, characterized by a dramatic oil price drop.  These underlying dynamics mean that the resource slump cycle will continue into the foreseeable future. Past resource cycles have continued on average for 13 to 15 years, because it takes time for supply infrastructure to realign with demand dynamics. Therefore, the current mismatch in demand and supply is likely to persist until 2027–2029. Renewable energy is a wild card as it is expected to continue to attract steady investment despite lower prices—likely as a result of less costly technologies, government regulations, and consumer preferences for cleaner power.  As a major exporter of minerals and an energy super power, this slump will particularly hurt the Canadian economy and the ability to maintain government tax revenue.

Canada and Cultural War in the Age of Trump

Adapted from A.T. Kearney 2016: A populist, worldwide backlash to globalization and neoliberal economic policies continues to spread in the wake of the Global Financial Crisis due to a broad range of underlying structural issues, from digital information proliferation to wealth inequality. This backlash is creating policy instability and raises the risk of a potentially hostile environment for globalized business models.  A.T. Kearney defines populism as a mass political movement that harnesses “the power of the people” to reject the elite and the status quo. Populism is usually concentrated around a charismatic leader, and often includes advocating for more redistributive economic policies—or even illiberal tendencies to concentrate power in a single individual.  The impact for governments is navigating protectionist trade partners; volatility in civil, constitutional, policy and regulatory endeavours, and the risk of knee-jerk reactions resulting in the break down of civil society.  Compounding this challenge is the ‘dumbing-down’ effect of social media converting civil discussion and complex thought into 144 character sound bits and simple likes and memes.

Editors Note: There is a description that a cultural war is underway in the United States between ‘progressives’ or left and ‘populists’ or right.  Hillary Clinton, Bernie Sanders and the Democratic Party are progressives with Sarah Palin and being populists.  Generally the left accuse the right as being fascists (for more on how this may be topsy turvy, see: ‘The Big Lie: Exposing the Nazi Roots of the American Left‘) and the right accuses the left of destroying liberal democracy through masked thugs and censorship of institutions such as universities.  In Canada we have less of this possibly because our political system allows for a more nuanced reflection of opinions (e.g. we have left of center NDP, right of center Conservatives and the center-left Liberal Parties. Nevertheless, what is the impact of this cultural war coming to Canada and can our democratic institutions survive the battles?

Day 5 – Islandization, IT and Post-Consumerism

This is the second last list of potential disruptive factors that could influence the Canadian Public Service over the next decade or so.  See the previous blogs for previous disruptions and Seven Days of Disruption blog for the entire set.  These are in support of November 22, 2017 FMI Conference – Disruptive Writers.

  • “Islandization” of the global economy (2017), NAFTA Negotiations and the rise of protectionism (editor)
  • IT Revolution 2.0 and the Rise of the Machines (adapted from 2015)
  • Post Consumerism (adapted from 2016)

“Islandization” (2017), NAFTA Negotiations and the rise of protectionism (editor)

Adapted from A.T. Kearney 2017: After a quarter century of rapid globalization, restrictions on immigration, trade, and other cross-border flows are now increasing. A new phase—which we call “islandization”—has begun, marked by growing levels of nationalism, protectionism, and parochialism. While the United States is at the center of this trend, many of the countries leading the globalization charge are also quietly islandizing, creating a dramatically different operating environment for global businesses and governments.

Editors Note: Returning to the Great Depression, one of its acknowledged causes of its prolongation was the establishment of trade barriers between advanced economies exactly at the time when economic activity was needed the most.  At the same time, exporting jobs and manufacturing skills undermines an economy and a tax base.  In other words trade like most things is something to be managed with no exact ‘pre-set’ value.  Canada is a directly beneficiary of being a trading nation even if most of it goes south to our NAFTA partner.

IT Revolution 2.0 and the Rise of the Machines

Adapted from A.T. Kearney 2015: The Internet of Things (IoT) is a fast-growing constellation of connected “smart devices,” such as smartphones,  self-driving cars,  household appliances, industrial robots and smart electrical grids. With continued dramatic growth in connectivity, these machines increasingly transmit information to one another and take real-world actions without humans in the loop. Beyond gizmos and conveniences, IoT may lead to dramatic change for societies, economies and governments.  For example, if self-driving vehicles take off, what are the regulatory, economic and employment impacts of giving up this human activity?

Editors Note: Industrial robots are an important IoT growth and China is forecasted to become the world’s largest user of industrial robots by 2017.  This means greater competition for manufacturing jobs and industries in Canada.  Beyond productivity, the IoT also contains significant cyber-security and privacy concerns for consumers and citizens.  As a positive, the innovation and productivity gains are central to the miracle of human development we have seen over the past two hundred years.  The Industrial, Green, Fossil Fuel and Information Revolutions have all created greater material wealth for humans… notwithstanding the negative corresponding negative impacts to the planet and our fellow species.  In other words, two hopes: 1) we can manage the rise of the machines to generally improve the human condition and 2) our robot overlords treat us better than we have treated some of our fellow animals and humans.

Post Consumerism

Adapted from A.T. Kearney 2016: Consumer values and preferences in developed markets are shifting toward buying fewer physical goods and valuing experiences over possessions. While this is creating new business opportunities for service providers, it also raises important challenges for traditional consumer products groups and retailers.  Concurrent with this change is the emergence of the Amazon.com who are effectively competing for a shrinking pool of consumption.  The OECD reports that the rate at which member countries consume physical materials has begun to decline and that at present “OECD countries generate 50 percent more economic value per unit of material resources than in 1990.” While this change is generally good for the environment (and likely good for the soul – editor) it may also pose challenges to governments as retail outlets fail and small business retailers cannot compete with either Amazon or online digital experiences.

Editors Note: Remember Abraham Maslow and his hierarchy of needs?  If post-consumerism turns out to be a ‘thing’ it certainly would validate Maslow’s work?  There is some tough sledding though including unwinding a century of modern marketing and an economic structure based on consumption.  Nevertheless our landfills and planet would probably thank us.

Day 2: Power, Cyber-Security and Renewables

This is the second list of potential disruptive factors that could influence the Canadian Public Service over the next decade or so.  See the previous blog for the first set of three and Seven Days of Disruption blog for the entire set.  These are in support of November 22, 2017 FMI Conference – Disruptive Writers.

  • Changing Nature of Power (2015)
  • Cyber Insecurity (2015)
  • Dawning of a new urban transportation age and the Canadian City (2017 and editor)

Changing Nature of Power (2015)

Adapted from A.T. Kearney 2015: In today’s world, power is increasingly fleeting and diffuse.  It is disseminated across individuals empowered by new technologies such as search engines and social media; to lower levels of government, including cities; and to start-ups and user-driven networked organizations. The rise of the global middle class is leading to greater individualism and expectations for service from their governments and from businesses, with consumers having never had a broader freedom of choice. Global trust in most institutions reached an all-time low in 2015, with governments continuing to be the least-trusted institution.

Editor note: So What?  The answer is that trust is foundation of a society and an economy.  It profoundly reduces the transaction cost in both.  Public institutions support this trust by enforcing social norms. In a strange twist, public institutions are sometimes powerless at the hands of a small but vocal group of individuals.

For example, an August 2017 discussion on free speech at Ryerson University was cancelled because the University was concerned about safety and security.  Described as domestic terrorism by one of the panelists, this is an example of public institution (Ryerson) self-censuring thought and discussion with a resulting degradation of its own power and trust.  While the individuals involved may congratulate themselves on forcing their view points onto an entire institution, they should also recognize that they are sharing a common heritage with the black, brown or red shirts who dominated politics a century ago.

Cyber Insecurity (2015)

Adapted from A.T. Kearney 2015:While the upside of the Internet is enormous, cyber threats continue to multiply. Estimates put global cyber crime losses at somewhere between $375 billion and $575 billion annually.  All connected devices and systems are vulnerable to attack. Computer systems, for example, are vulnerable to ransomware. The growing IoT also lacks strong security systems and is highly vulnerable to data theft.  To make matters more complex, the cyber arena is a growing domain of warfare between countries, in which businesses can be caught in the crossfire. The “Darknet”—parts of the “Deep Web” that are not discoverable by traditional search engines—remains a serious criminal threat, especially with the rise of crypto-currencies. It is cloaked with encryption software that provides anonymity to users. The Darknet is used as a source of cyber attacks, as well as a place to buy and sell ransomware and other cyber weapons. Another business risk of the Darknet is that it provides a marketplace for stolen data collected through cyber attacks, augmenting hackers’ motivation to continue conducting such attacks.

Editor note: Governments see online services as a way to provide better government for fewer resources.  The Singapore, Scandinavia and the United Kingdom are acknowledged leaders in this effort although the Canada Revenue Agency has also made great strides in allowing for a digital experience.  Nevertheless, governments have a number of challenges including the Facebook-effect, the Shiny-bauble problem and resource asymmetry.

Facebook Effect – You are the Product

The Facebook-effect is the problem of comparing government services to a for profit service such as Facebook.  If Facebook can provide service xyz or make its offerings free, why can’t a government?  There are of course a number of answers to this.  Firstly Facebook is not constrained by the same legal, moral and democratic frameworks.  Facebook has an entirely different revenue model.  For social media, the user is the product.  Thus your likes, shares and contributions builds up a profile of you as a person which can then be monetized.  For governments such monetization of a citizen would be outrageous.  Finally, Facebook can fail while governments are expected to be enduring.  If Facebook ceased to exist tomorrow it would be inconvenient but a new social media product would take its place (anyone still using MySpace?).

The Shiny-Bauble Problem

Governments like to implement new things.  Ribbon cutting and shovel turning is good press and leads to the primary objective of any government – staying in power.  As a result, governments get distracted by the Shiny-Bauble which have a short-term effect or solution that has little enduring value and may cause long-term harm to a society.  The worst thing about Shiny-Baubles is that they may become entrenched in a society by a small group who benefit from the government largess.  In other words, the only thing worst than a Shiny-Bauble is trying to turn one-off.

Resource Asymmetry

Governments often have fewer and less enabled resources to delivery digital services or fight cyber-threats than the legitimate and illegitimate competitors.  The above Facebook discussion is one aspect of this resource asymmetry and consuming valuable government resources pursuing a Shiny-Bauble is another.  A darker example of asymmetry is that the bad guys only need to look for and exploit a single weakness in a government’s cyber environment.  At the same time, a government must fight all threats while trying to provide services.

Dawning of a new urban transportation age and age of renewables (2017 and editor)

Adapted from A.T. Kearney 2015: The global urban population has risen steadily over the past two decades. According to the United Nations (UN), there were about 2.9 billion urbanites in 2000, but that number has increased to 4.1 billion and will hit 4.5 billion in 2022. The number of megacities, defined as cities with 10 million or more inhabitants, rose from just 17 in 2000 to 29 in 2015, and the total is projected to rise to 36 by 2025. Hyper-urbanization is heightening congestion levels in cities around the world. The age of the automobile may be ending as cities adopt innovative new technologies and use more traditional mass and individual transit methods to enable smarter and more sustainable urban transportation and growth.

(Editor) Public transit and electric vehicles are two ways that urbanization will change the face of a city but tele-commuting and promoting walk/bike-able cities are another.  This raises a challenge for Canadians as much of our housing stock has been built since the mid-20th century and the economics and logistics for all of these mitigating solutions will require significant government investment and coordination.  It will also require a change in cultural norms and expectations as owing a home has become central to financial and personal-security well-being.

Day 1: Climate, Biotech and Canadian Competitiveness

What are some of the larger potential disruptive factors that could influence the Canadian Public Service over the next decade or less.  The following three are the first in a list that will be used at the November 22, 2017 FMI Conference – Disruptive Writers.

  • Seven Days of Disruption (Initial Blog).
  • Accelerating Global Climate Change and the cost to mitigate (2015 and editor)
  • Biotechnology: Frankenstein, Super-bugs and Super-cures (adapted from 2016 and editor)
  • Canadian Competitiveness and Productivity (editor)

Accelerating Global Climate Change and the Cost to Mitigate

Adapted from A.T. Kearney 2015: Food production, rising sea levels, increased range of tropical diseases and impacts to fragile environments such as the arctic and northern forests are some of the negative impacts identified.  At the same time, Canada could be a net beneficiary as more of its land mass becomes suitable for agriculture and lower cost for exploration of mineral wealth in the arctic.  These are tenuous gains as compared to social and mass population upheavals however.

Editor note: in many ways the past 200+ years of using fossil fuels can be compared to a young person inheriting a vast fortune from an unknown dead relative.  The changes have been both negative and positive.

On the positive side, there are billions of people alive today or who have lived in the past two centuries that would not have lived without the exploitation of fossil fuels.  Fossil fuels have given us a standard of living in which even the poorest Canadian is living better than many past kings or queens.  Hydrocarbons deliver clean water, warm homes, take away sewage, pave our streets, move food to our stores, fix nitrogen out of the air to grow the food and give us miracle materials such as plastics.

However, like a young adult waking up from a massive party we are also noticing that the trust fund is running low.  As well, 200+ years of living with fossil fuels has directly or indirectly killed many of our fellow species, polluted our homes.  The hunt for the fuels have led to corruption and creating vast fortunes in societies that have exported extremism and intolerance of things like women’s rights.

The cost to leave the fossil fuel era is considerable and may not occur in our lifetime.  The reality is that the engineering and technologies to replace an energy dense and convenient storage medium such as gasoline is considerable.  Canada has committed to shutter its coal power plants.  In 2014 this represented approximately 10% of the nation’s total generation nearly all in Western Canada [1].  Assuming these plants are closed by the target date of 2030, 63.6 terrawatt hours of capacity will need to be replaced [2].  Globally, Canada’s coal generation represents 0.67% of the total world generation capacity [3].  Thus the cost of leaving fossil fuels in the ground are not only direct but indirect as we place ourselves at a competitive disadvantage despite being a global powerhouse in energy reserves.

Biotechnology

Adapted from A.T. Kearney 2016: Just four years after its invention, “copy-and-paste” biotechnology is bending the cost and timeline curves for major scientific breakthroughs. CRISPR-Cas9—which stands for “clustered, regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats” and “CRISPR-associated protein number nine”—was discovered in 2012. This biotechnology has the ability to delete, repair, or replace genes, making it a function for genetic manipulation that will allow researchers to do three things more cheaply and effectively than ever before: alter human genetic code, cure diseases, and even create new lifeforms.   Its applications will have far-reaching impacts on a multitude of industries, altering business models, regulatory environments, and consumer demands and preferences worldwide.

Editor’s Note: Bio-technology is one of the things that makes us human even if the technology part has advanced considerably.  10,000 years ago the methods would have included burning forests to plant crops or encourage grazing animals; selecting grains such as wheat, rye or rice; or domesticating the dog, horse or cow.

More recently state sponsored food research was central to of the green revolution of the late 20th century.  Genetically modified food has continued this revolution although with a sense of unease.  Bio-technology promises designer cures for diseases and an improved standard of living for humanity.  The shadow includes Frankenfoods, designer babies and other nightmares from science fiction.  Regulation and a stable civil society is one way to control this.  Another method is to ensure that the work is done in a culture of openness and transparency – something perhaps more difficult if the research leaves Western countries and is taken up in repressive regimes or nations lacking a history of civil discussion.

Canadian Competitiveness

Adapted from the Conference Board of Canada: Canada’s standing on the 2017 Global Competitive Index as issued by World Economic Forum improved one place to 14th.  Switzerland ranks first, followed by the United States, Singapore, the Netherlands, and Germany.  Taxation and government regulation impeded competitiveness while a good K-12 and post-secondary education systems provided an offset.  Canada benefits from efficient labour markets and a sound financial and securities systems.  Canada lacks consistent investment in research and development, has degrading public infrastructure, poor coordination between universities and business and an over-reliance on natural resources.

Editors Note: This subject was discussed at the September 21, 2016 FMI Edmonton Chapter event Fostering Innovation in the Public Service When Money is Tight.

[1] Adapted from Canada Coal Profile, Figure 6 and Table 1, accessed 2017-11-13; https://www.iea.org/ciab/papers/Canada.pdf.
[2] ibid Power generation (gross) in TWh in 2014.
[3] Key World Energy Statistics, Electricity Generation by source, accessed 2017-11-13;  http://www.iea.org/publications/freepublications/publication/KeyWorld2017.pdf

…. And I Endorse This Message.

Recently the Edmonton Chapter of the Financial Management Institute reached out to three levels of government to promote their May 17, 2017 Mental Health Event.  The result: two endorsements and some notes on how to ask senior officials and politicians to promote an event.

Why Do you Need an Endorsement?

A little context please… You are on a committee of some sort.  It may be for a volunteer organization (e.g. FMI, Scouts, church or work related) and you are doing something special (running a conference, publishing a book, launching a program or a website).  In doing this you would like someone important (politician, senior public servant, corporate officer or religious official – collectively these are affectionately known as the “grand pooh bahs of something” or the GPBS) to acknowledge or endorse the thing you are doing.

Because this is a memory jog for me, the focus of this blog is an assumption that you are on the board of a FMI Chapter here in Canada and you want a GBPS to endorse your upcoming conference. The first question to ask is ‘Why do you want/need a GPBS endorsement?‘; typical reasons include:

  • Mercantile: to increase sales to an event because you can point to the “GBPS’ endorsement” as proof the organization thinks it is important.
  • Extending a Corporate or Social Policy: increase the credibility of the event by showing that if good ole’ GBPS says it is important, it must be.
  • Immediate or Future Marketing: asking for an endorsement is one way that a GBPS will have a better awareness of your organization.  Reminding the GBPS of the endorsement is a potential ice breaker for other discussions.
  • Get Around Training Limitations: organizations may have constrained training budgets.  Having an organization’s GBPS endorse the event is a way to pry open the coffers.

What Am I Endorsing – the So What Question?

The next question to ask is what is in it for the GBPS?  This is critical as it is easier to get an endorsement that aligns with a policy, initiative or passion of the person rather than the GBPS being neutral, indifferent, or worse, hostile to your upcoming conference.

The reality is that the garden variety GBPS is probably interested in many of the same things you are.  In fact an endorsement could be a cheap and easy way for the GPBS to show progress on a subject area with very little cost or effort to them or their office.  For example, the theme of the May 17 FMI-Edmonton conference introduced above was a mentally healthy work place.  This was important to both the senior official from the Alberta government (who is passionate about employee engagement) and is central the federal government as well (the senior official has devoted considerable effort promoting mental health within the federal public service).

So, What Do you Want?

Be very clear what you want and articulate it early.  The following list of ‘ASKS’ is ordered from the easiest to the hardest for a GBPS to provide to your organization:

  1. Provide a letter of introduction or greetings.
  2. Provide written, in person or video opening comments and greetings.
  3. Endorse attendance and use this endorsement in FMI communications.
  4. Attend, speak or present at the event.

A letter of greetings is very low-cost for a GBPS particularly if you mostly write the letter for them (see more on this below).  Providing opening comments to a conference is slightly harder but once again are made easier if you write the first draft.  Attendance, video greetings or presentations are tough.  A GBPS’ calendar is not their own and even if they say they will attend they have a nasty habit of bailing at the last moment.  An endorsement to attend is also difficult to provide particularly if it sets up a precedence for other conferences.

The Care and Feeding of a GBPS

As noted above, the office of the GBPS is probably swamped – so make their life simple; this means doing the following (the first two bullets are recaps from above – but worth repeating):

  • Understand why you want the endorsement.
  • Be clear how this helps the GBPS achieve their goals and what is the ASK.
  • Send a clear request through formal channels (if they exist) but also use your informal networks to promote the endorsement with the GBPS.
  • Provide the GPBS with samples and even write the first draft as applicable.
  • Follow up with a courtesy phone call or email; be short, sweet and extremely respective of the person’s time.  For example, Betty is the Chief of Staff for the Deputy Minister GBPS; a phone call may follow this script:
    • JOHN: “Hello Betty, it is John Smith here. I am following up on an email I sent you two days ago concerning Mr. GBPS providing a letter of endorsement for our FMI conference on left-handed screw drivers.  Can you confirm that your office has received it?”
    • JOHN: “You did, perfect and thank you for confirming this.”
    • JOHN: “As you work through your internal processes, if you have any questions about the conference I am happy to answer them on the phone, email or pop down to your office.”
    • JOHN: “May I follow-up in two weeks to see how the letter is progressing?”
    • JOHN: “Is there anybody else I should be speaking with from your office so I don’t bother you”
    • JOHN: “Thank you very much for taking the time to talk and confirm the endorsement letter is in progress, it is greatly appreciated!”
  • Email is the typical way to initiate contact.  A sample format can be found at the bottom of the blog but generally is broken into the following:
    • 1. Salutation and who is FMI: A quick overview of who you are and what is FMI.  1-2 sentences is lots but include some links at the bottom in case the GBPS’ staff needs to do some research.
    • 2. The ASK and the WHY: Provide 1-3 sentences of what you are asking for, by when, how it will be used and what is in it for the GBPS.
    • 3. Thank You and the Sample: Close the email and include a sample (as applicable) for the ASK.  This may be in the email or attached.

Follow Up and Usage

When you have received the endorsement, immediately send a thank you note to the people who made it happen.  1-2 lines very short expressing your appreciation.

Hi Betty, John Smith here from FMI.  I received the endorsement letter and I wanted to let you know it is perfect.  I strongly believe that this conference will really advance an understanding of left-handed screw drivers and you and your office helped to make this happen.  Once again, on behalf of my board, thank you.

Only use the endorsement in manner you said you were going to use it.  If you said it was going to be on the chapter website, don’t necessarily send it out via your Linked in account to all of your users.  Think of the endorsement as a matter of trust – respect that gift of trust.

After the Event

The last step is easily as important as all the others above, let the GBPS know how the conference went and the impact of their endorsement.  Once again a quick email is sufficient.  Thank the GBPS re-affirms the time they spent providing the endorsement, increases your brand recognition and improves the chances of getting a future endorsement.

Hi Betty, John Smith from FMI.  I wanted to let you know the May 17 conference on left-handed screw drivers was a complete success.  3,000 enthusiastic public servants attended and we really advanced an understanding of this issue.  Once again the endorsement letter Mr. GBPS provided really helped to make this conference successful.  Thank you once again!

Links

Hello Ms. EBPS,

I am a Director with the Government of Widgetland but I am writing you wearing my other hat as President of the Financial Management Institute (FMI) Yegville Chapter. I am a volunteer board member with this not for profit organization and our primary purpose is to deliver high quality learning events on topics that are of interest to a public sector audience from all three levels of government. Our next event will be coming up on Wednesday May 17, 2098 and will include an impressive lineup of speakers who will address the topic of ‘The Safe Use and History of the Left Handed Screwdrivers‘.

I know in your role as Deputy Minister of Grand Pooh Bah and with our provincial government focus on employee engagement, you have a strong desire to support and encourage healthy left-handed activities and a resilient workforce that is well positioned for the future. So would you be willing to provide some written greetings from the Government of Widget Land that could be included in our moderator’s opening remarks? I believe that your message would be well received by our audience and would help boost our profile as well as share a positive message. Thank you in advance for considering my request and I look forward to hearing your reply in the near future.

By way of additional background we are part of the National Financial Management Institute of Canada that serves over 2,800 members across Canada. www.fmi.ca

In addition, the link below will give you some additional information about our upcoming event as well as past events that were delivered by the Yegville Chapter.

http://www.fmi.ca/chapters/yegville/

I have taken the liberty of providing some suggested content and format:

Format: an open letter from Ms. GBPS to members of the Widget land Public Service, fellow public servants and other attendees.  This will be reproduced digitally in the front of the pre-conference notes.

Re: Greetings from the Deputy Minister of Grand Pooh Bah.

Dear Colleagues,

[Note to  GBPS’s staff, possible themes in the message]…

  • Greetings from the Widgetland Public Service.
  • Public servants from all levels of all governments need to create open, inclusive and healthy workplaces for staff and colleagues.
  • Attending a conference such as this one is one way to learn more about how to build such work places.
  • Meet fellow public servants and learn how we can better serve our constituents through a healthy work place.
  • Safety is a paramount concern for the government of Widgetland and left handed screw drivers caused more than 1,000 injuries last year in our province.